mHealth, Health Systems and Development

 

This course examines mHealth in relation to health systems

and development; asking questions about how mHealth fits

into the often-inadequate and poor-resourced health systems

in low and middle income countries, about regulation, politics

and policy, knowledge and gender relations and about how

people in poverty experience ill health. 

Access the course

About this course 

This course examines mHealth in relation to health systems and development; asking questions about how mHealth fits into the often-inadequate and poor-resourced health systems in low and middle income countries, about regulation, politics and policy, knowledge and gender relations and about how people in poverty experience ill health. It also examines other mobile phone innovations which bene fit the poor, and asks what lessons are to be leant. In so doing, the focus is on how mHealth might be used as a means to address development challenges, equity and access in health systems. Bangladesh is presented as a particular case study in this course, as it both faces very large health and development challenges with extremely low ratios of qualified health personnel in rural areas and high rates of poverty, as well as being well known for its innovative approach to mHeath. A core aspect of the course is to examine change and transition, looking at innovation, pathways of change in a health knowledge economy. 

What will you learn

By the end of the module a successful student should be able to:

  1. Develop a sophisticated awareness of the current use of mHealth in low and middle income countries, in conjunction with broader regulatory, governance, equity, and implementation considerations.

  2. Critically analyse and debate the opportunities and challenges associated with mHealth as a means of addressing health and development issues (including making reference to concepts such as gender, knowledge, power, behaviour change, health systems, pathways of change). 

Last modified: Wednesday, 24 June 2015, 6:29 AM